Dianne Feinstein Joins California in Supporting Cannabis Industry

The stack of reading material 

on Dianne Feinstein's bedside table must be immense.

 

How else could one explain that the US Senator from California waited until 2018 to support an industry that voters here legalized 20 years ago? 

 

Or another way... how else to explain her belated support of an industry projected to generate $1 Billion per year in state tax revenues? (Revenues that are completely captive in California, due to a little federal issue).

 

Doesn't really matter, now that she's on the bright side of the fence, but here's her reason, as reported to the Sacramento Bee: "Feinstein's office said her views changed after meetings with constituents, particularly those with young children who have benefited from medical marijuana use."

 

This article started out a bit chippy, but we completely agree with Senator Feinstein on the most important reason the cannabis industry is worth fighting for.

 

It's not just the industry's projected 250,000 jobs in 2 years' time ("more than ...manufacturing, utilities or even government jobs..."); it's not just the regulation and control of a black market in order to protect patients and children; it's not the issue of states' rights ... though it is all of these things, and more.

 

The reason we fight for legalization is that those who need it - really need it - cannot fight for themselves.

 

Americans like 12-year old cancer-survivor Rylie Maedler, or 12-year old epilepsy survivor Alexis Bortell

 

In a January 2018 article about Rylie we said, "For a long time, we at The American Cannabis Report have said any legislator who votes against medicinal cannabis should have to look a sick child in the eye and tell her she has to die because the legislator believes cannabis is bad.

 

Go ahead, Senator, tell her. We'll wait..."

 

From now on, Diane Feinstein won't have to look that child in the eye.

 

Welcome aboard, Senator.

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The American Cannabis Report
(C) 2018 Eastman Smith Communications